Brazilian Coffee Overview

Brazil is probably one of the best known coffee producing countries in the world and produces about 1/3 of the entire worlds coffee production. Coffee typically varies in terms of quality ranging from low altitude robusta to high altitude experimental process microlots with cupping scores over 90. This is probably the most diverse coffee producing origin in the world.

Brazil Fazenda Paraiso (photo credit: DR Wakefield)

Brazil Fazenda Paraiso

There are significant large areas in Brazil dedicated to coffee production. One of the most well know Brazilian coffees is simply titled 'Brazil Santos' and is named after the port of export rather than a producer or region. Traditionally coffee in Brazil was blended into massive lots making traceability quite challenging. Large estate farms tend to be easier to source coffee from but in the last 10-15 years traceability has improved significantly and it is now possible to find great speciality coffees from groups of small producers or from smaller estate farms. We work directly with Fazenda Inhame, a small family owned farm. 

Processing Methods

Coffee is well know for producing natural and pulped-natural coffees.

  • Pulped Natural: The outer layer of the coffee cherry is removed using a pulping machine. Coffee is then dried and this will often take place on large concrete patios. This method is very similar to 'honey processed' coffee.
  • Natural: The coffee is harvested and dried, usually on large concrete patios like in the image below take at Brazil Fazenda Inhame.

Brazil Fazenda Inhame

Flavour Profile

Brazil is know for a distinctive flavour profile that often features nut and chocolate notes. Really good coffees from Brazil will often have complex flavours that include cashew, almond, chocolate and balanced fruit notes that could include stone fruit or dried fruits like raisin and prune. Coffees tend to be fairly low in acidity perhaps due to the lower average altitudes and processing methods.

This isn't always the case though and there are farms in Brazil that produce washed coffees and experiments like anaerobic fermentation and these coffees can showcase a very diverse range of flavours.